Flannel and Fleece Drawstring Neck-Warmer

Flannel and Fleece Drawstring Neck-warmer, Kiku Corner 3

I designed this drawstring neck-warmer because I decided to finally beat winter this year. I haven’t needed too many layers with these unusually warm temperatures we’re experiencing and I’m not complaining. Still, as a proud former Girl Guide, I like to be prepared. This is the second generation of a more masculine neck piece I made for Donatello last year.

There are some elements in the first version that I loved, such as the fleece lining and the snap closures. I also modified other features with Donatello’s guidance, after he battled one icy winter with it. This version has a drawstring closure that can secure it high on your face during a storm and a tapered bottom edge is more comfortable to wear around your shoulders.

For the natural tapered edge, I used the lower back portion of an old wool flannel shirt. It is not mandatory to use a shirt, but it saves you from measuring out the symmetrical bottom edge. Enjoy your drawstring neck-warmer for the next big winter storm!

Flannel and Fleece Drawstring Neck-warmer, Kiku Corner 4

Flannel and Fleece Drawstring Neck-Warmer

Supplies

White fleece, 80 cm x 45cm

Wool flannel, 80 cm x 45cm (taken from the bottom, back edge of a shirt

1m white cord, 4mm thick

One wooden bead, 1.5cm diameter

White thread

One medium safety pin

Size

Circumference: 75cm

Height at front: 37cm

Height at back: 28cm

Instructions

  1.  Measure and cut out fleece and flannel to same size, as indicated above. Prepare your sewing machine with white thread and a straight, medium length stitch.
  2. To make the drawstring casing: On the longer, straight edge of the fleece (this will be the inside top of the finished product), fold over approximately 3cm of the top edge. Using white thread, stitch approximately 2.5cm from the top in a medium-length stitch.
  3. Wrong sides out, lay the fleece over the flannel, line up the edges and pin together.
  4. Sew together the two pieces of fabric at the top long edge and the bottom tapered edge using a 0.5cm seam allowance. The result will be a long tube.
  5. Start turning the tube inside out, stopping half way so that the wrong sides are still out but the tube is half as short and all four un-hemmed edges are lined up. The like fabrics should be touching (flannel lines up with flannel, fleece lines up with fleece). Pin like fabrics together, leaving a 10cm opening in the white fleece portion.
  6. Sew around the pinned opening, leaving the 10cm hole open. Remove pins and pull whole piece inside out through the hole.
  7. Fold the edges of the hole inward, pin, and hand stitch it closed.
  8. In the back of the drawstring casing, cut two small holes approximately 0.5cm wide. See placement of holes below, where the cord leaves the neck-warmer.

Flannel and Fleece Drawstring Neck-warmer, Kiku Corner 5

9. Anchor the holes by stitching at either end of each cut, like a button hole.

10. Pin the safety pin to the end of the white cord. Insert it into one of the holes. Work the safety pin and cording through the casing. Pull the safety pin through the opposite hole.

11. Thread two ends of cord through wooden bead and tie a knot at the end of each piece of loose cord.

Flannel and Fleece Drawstring Neck-warmer, Kiku Corner 1

Flannel and Fleece Drawstring Neck-warmer, Kiku Corner

Tomiko's Signature, Kiku Corner

14 comments

  1. Michelle says:

    This is the coolest thing. I like that it is functional without all the heaviness of a scarf. Here in the south it gets cold, but sometimes it is my neck that is cold all the time, more than the rest of my body. This would be perfect. Thanks for modeling this at my party today. Happy Thursday!

  2. Angela says:

    This is a great idea and would be perfect to keep me extra warm in the Maine winters. Thank you for sharing at the Sunday Fitness & Food Link-up. Pinned! 🙂

  3. Pat says:

    Tomiko,
    LOVE this, girl! As a transplanted Yankee to the South, I remember the cold days of winter…and have less and less desire to suffer through them! This is perfect for where I live now…just enough to stay cozy anytime I’m out and about!
    Thanks so much for sharing this at Coffee & Conversation! We love having you there each week 🙂

  4. Ada says:

    Hi Tomiko, I am Ada. Glad I found your blog. That scarf is too cute and I adore the camel fedora. Great, put-together cold-weather look.

    I would love for you to stop by my blog and I just started a new linkup on Thursdays so welcome by and join with this outfit, tomorrow. Thank you, Ada. =)

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